diy "febreze" aka fabric refresher

Whenever an easy and inexpensive do-it-yourself project presents itself, I find it almost impossible to not bookmark it. And when it’s something useful for everyday life, it’s an instant must-try.

Like this recipe for “Febreze” fabric refresher. I use fabric and linen sprays quite often to freshen up sheets and curtains with that nice, freshly-laundered scent. But I try to keep the spritzing to a minimum, as it’s almost shocking how you can go through one bottle so quickly. However, according to Fake-It-Frugal, the diy version will save you over $5. That’s what I call a super deal.


You will need:
A clean, empty spray bottle
1/8 cup liquid fabric softener
1-2 teaspoons baking soda
Warm to hot tap water


Mix the fabric softener and baking soda. 
Pour into spray bottle.
Add the water and fill to the top.

Ready, set…spray!

 Just as good, if not better, than any store brand, in my opinion.

And for a greener, more natural option, try this simple tutorial (I’m trying it next time!).

Update: Spot-test before you use. Also, a commenter below reported that this does not work well with suede fabrics.

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31 Responses to diy "febreze" aka fabric refresher

  1. jkd says:

    omg, have to try it!

  2. Kyla says:

    Oh what a neat tutorial! I love creative DIYs like this :)

  3. sherri lynn says:

    I love knowing how to make things like this myself! Thanks for sharing!

  4. Megan says:

    YES! I need to do this!

  5. Francesca says:

    What a great idea, I can learn a lot from you. I am following you from Rome!

  6. Meghan @ Wishful Thinking says:

    Awesome! I go through bottles of it (especially in our old car that always smells a bit like a pond) so I will definitely be trying this! I wonder what the significance of the baking powder is?

  7. jillian m. says:

    Meghan, I believe the baking soda is in it for it's deodorizing properties. I know it's used in a few laundry detergents as an active ingredient as well.

  8. Alena: Oh, It's Just Perfect! says:

    I love these types of posts!! Cheap, easy and more natural–perfect!

  9. la petite coquine says:

    Genius!

  10. Ashley says:

    did it spray out blue? Just wondering :)

    • Antiqua says:

      Was wondering the same thing, don’t want it to stain certain fabrics.

      • Jillian says:

        Antiqua, I’ve had no problems with staining. But if you’d like to be on the safe side, just use a little less softener. Or one that has the less coloring.

  11. Kaleido Mind says:

    very handy!!

  12. jillian m. says:

    Ashley, not at all! I sprayed it on a white pillowcase and no blue appeared. Although, I did think about that and next time, I might use a tiny bit less softener, just to be on the safe side.

  13. kristina@beancakes ★ says:

    jillian ~ i like yours better, a lot less chemicals and better for the environment indeed!!
    xx ~ kristina

  14. Jamillah says:

    LOVE LOVE the green option!!!

  15. Rose Penelope says:

    I love this idea!!! :) Thank you for sharing. I think I may gop "pin it" to my pinterest! :)

  16. little t says:

    Love this tip :)

  17. N Pezz says:

    I just made this.. it smells wonderful. I used my favorite fabric softner “Gain” mango tango! Its fabulous!

  18. Meg says:

    Awesome, works better than Febreeze and I get to choose the scent! Now my whole house smells like Gain!

  19. Stacy says:

    I’ve tried this and I have a change that makes it 100% better:
    In your spray bottle add the following:

    4 tablespoons of white vinegar
    2 tablespoons of baking soda
    either use 1/4 cup of fabric softener or dissolve a tablespoon of laundry crystals in 1/4 cup of water
    fill remaining bottle with warm water.

    take care to shake well before each spraying.

    • Amanda says:

      I used this version of the recipe with clear & free fabric softener, since I have very sensitive skin, and it is AMAZING. Everything smells clean and my skin doesn’t itch. Excellent stuff. :)

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  22. Lili says:

    If you just want to remove odors and kill bacteria on textiles that cannot be washed (rather than adding scent/chemicals), try the old traveling theater trick for costumes. Find the cheapest possible bottle of vodka. Yes, vodka. Don’t waste your money on the drinkable stuff–go for rotgut, unflavored. It’s colorless and once dried, odorless. Put in spray bottle and spray the offending garment/textile until damp (not soaking wet). As the fabric dries, the vodka smell will disappear, taking with it pet, smoke, sweat and other odors. Works much better than febreeze and leaves no residue. Truly a lifesaver. I traveled all over Europe with a theater company and without this trick, we would have spent a fortune dry-cleaning our elaborate costumes.

  23. Stephanie says:

    I tried this over the weekend on my suede couch and made the mistake of not testing a small area first…..I learned the hard way that it does stain suede fabric. I have little white spots all over my couch :( I guess my next pinterest adventure will be figuring out how to clean suede furniture.

    • Shantel says:

      It’s the baking soda that leaves the residue! I’ve tried using little to no baking soda and that has worked for me…

    • Jillian says:

      Stephanie, I’m so sorry this happened to you. I’ll update the post to include a warning against suede furniture. Thank you for the input!

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